Defining Humanity: The Fate Of Internet Of Things

Author:Mr Alex Van Cruysen and Rohit George
Profession:Deloitte
 
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The debate around the Internet of Things (IoT) is growing and as the number and variety of connected devices grow, the fate of IoT will lie on the cultural and social paradigms that define humanity as a whole. 

While the press may focus on consumers controlling their thermostats, lights and appliances (from washing machines to tea kettles), Deloitte predicts that 60 percent of all wireless IoT devices will be bought, paid for and used by enterprises and industries. And over 90 percent of the services revenue generated will be enterprise, not consumer. Regardless of which market participant will adopt IoT faster, the debate around it will necessarily expand into much more than the media buzz we read today. Indeed, right now, IoT is about rubbish bins that are capable of ordering eggs when it calculates that stocks are low, and sometimes it's about all the data that the bin is gathering about consumers' habits. Essentially, it's all about the technology. As the number and variety of connected devices grow, however, the fate of IoT will lie on the cultural and social paradigms that define humanity as a whole. For example, sensors can now help novice hunters make long-distance shots with greater precision under cover, and share the "thrill of the hunt" with friends and family over the web. What role will the likes of PETA play in this debate, and how impactful will their message be? Where is the line between the (digital) gamification of (hunting) game, pun intended, and the gamification of, say, real-life warfare. At which point does 'live' gaming become, quite literally, too 'live'? Alternatively, surveys suggest people are happy for sensors to track their weight, cardiovascular health and sleep patterns, but...

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