Continuous investment and activity are key for staying ahead in the cyber arms race.

Position:DATABASE AND NETWORK INTELLIGENCE: OPINION
 
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Databarracks.

New data reveals that only 56 per cent of UK firms believe they have sufficient cyber security skills in-house to deal with threats.

UK organisations are concerned about their abilities to keep pace with the persistent rise of new cyber security challenges. This follows new data from business continuity and disaster recovery provider, Databarracks, revealing only 56 per cent of UK firms believe they have sufficient cyber security skills in-house to deal with threats against their business.

The findings were taken from Databarracks' annual Data Health Check survey. Now in its I Oth year, the survey questions over 400 IT decision makers in the UK on a series of critical issues relating to their IT, security and business continuity practices. Focusing specifically on cyber security, key findings include:

* In 2016, 59 per cent of respondents stated they had invested in safeguards to help fight against cyber threats in the last 12 months. In 2018, this figure is now 67 per cent.

* The types of safeguards organisations have invested in to protect against cyber threats have changed dramatically in recent years. In 2016, only 12 per cent of organisations confirmed they had updated their cyber security policy in the past 12 months. In 2018 that figure is 26 per cent. Similarly, cyber threat monitoring software is now used in 28 per cent of businesses compared to only 13 per cent of businesses in 2016.

* The employment of a Chief Security Information Officer, jumped from I per cent in 2016 to 14 per cent in 2018.

Peter Groucutt, managing director of Databarracks commented: "Investment in cyber security safeguards, should translate to improved confidence but the findings show it is yet to make a significant difference.

"We are in the midst of a...

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